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view of jesus in america. we'll ask the author of american stephen broth row with another view on the live line. captions produced by visual audio captioning barack obama barac barack obama barack obama >> dr. stephen prothero, welcome. your book has a ctral proposition, what is the proposition in the book? >> i think there's two. one is that jesus is many and mal oohable, there isn't just one jesus but there's many and the other is that jesus isn't just for christians in the united states, christians love jesus but so do buddhists and jews and hindus and people without any religion whatsoever. >> the jesus image is multiadaptble because we are a 3489 religious nation. >> that's right, we're a multireligious nation but also a christian nation where 80% or so of the country are christians and they put je'us on the national agenda and then people of all different religions and without any at all respond to that figure. >> why did thomas jefferson become consumed with revising the bible by omitting a lot of it in his own text of the bible as you began
rake, only on the money you make on the margin. stephen moore is here from the wall street journal and he's ready to jump out of his skin after i said that. he specializes in telling me why i'm wrong. and our other guest, david johnston wrote "the fine print." stephen, you are our resident anti-tax crusader. i totally agree every penny counts when it comes to your own money. when you compare the taxes most americans paid in past decades i don't get why republicans are screaming bloody murder about this. what would be so bad with the wealthiest among us chipping in a little bit more? i'm emphasizing just a little bit more. >> when you showed that chart of the tax rates that was exactly accurate. we had 70% tax rates in the '70s. that didn't turn out well. then we cut the rates significantly. went down to 50%, 28%. the rates went up to 35%. i would love to see you super impose on that chart the share of taxes paid by the rich. here is the interesting thing. >>> one of the reason the deficit went down is you had a big increase in the number of people making money. they paid more tax.
with author and journalist new book america's great debate stephen douglas and the compromise of preserve the union. will was so great about the great compromise? >> well most people would say they have only a vague recollection from high school. there was a crisis in 1850. the nature of the crisis was this. the country went to the brink of the civil war. most of the political culture and most americans thought the war was great to take place but the deep south was going to succeed and they were closer to the secession than most americans today even realize. certainly the deep south state. texas was arming other southern states were sending. had there been a collision with began in 1850 wouldn't have begun in charleston would have begun in santa fe mexico y? because texas did its own imperial ambitions to move westward supported by the slave holding south and to invade the new mexico territory. there were many other parts of the crisis with or not the last would be free. in 1850 the south was mother eternized, southern nationalism was at the peak. jefferson davis in 1850 said if the south
of spending restraight. >> i want to bring stephen moore back into the conversation. a lot of people don't like grover norquist you've defended him. you come from the same place in a lot of things. here's where i take issue. he said increasing taxes avoids the conversation on having the spending discussion. i said i don't think that's causal. i think we can agree we're not having a robust-enough conversation on how to deal with spending in this country and how to make government more efficient. is it a fact by raising taxes we're just not going to have that discussion? >> yeah, i believe so. i believe every time you raise taxes it reduces the pressure to cut spending and i agree with grover on that i want to take issue on one thing you said to grover that i think is a little unfair. the vote we had last week, the job boehner plan b, which actually there was no vote -- >> you know, you've been saying, these guys are just following the instructions of grover nor quest. look, i actually think republicans made a mistake personally in not approving plan b. but you know, the people voted again
at the in san francisco. today, dr. hansen is receiving the 2012 stephen schneider award for outstanding climate science climate one. stephen schneider was a who was involved in the formation of climate one that[applause] sandy. new york? to place it in a modern context, we have to turn to proxy data like coral and ice to piece together the puzzle of how the climate buried in the distant past. it showed it was relatively warm. it was about a thousand years ago. recently that exceeded anything we have seen. it was featured in the summary for policy makers in 2001. when it became an icon, those who find the science inconvenient saw the need to try to discredit this graph. they saw discrediting me as a way to do that. some have been attacked for the work they have done. i was also bill of five. my book tells the story of what it is like to be a scientist and find yourself in voluntary and accidental public figure. i was put in the limelight in limelight. [laughter] stick metaphor -- >> yes. that, if we as scientists are talking to the right people. reflag that we would not tell you but for fear tha
as it may seem to you, stephen, will it be a bad thing for the economy? >> i'm going to answer your question with a question. say that the republicans and i think at the end of the day, they probably will give bill clinton, barack obama his tax increase on the rich, but you know what? we go into 2013 with still a trillion dollar deficit and the question i ask you two and president obama if he were on the show, what's act two? what do we do next? >> you do agree with stephen on one thing and that is that there is some work to be done on inefficient spending? >> the best funding program we have in the government is social security. health care. for every dollar, the other three modern countries spend per capita in other dollar, we spend $2.64 and still have 50 million people without insurance. if we could get france's health care system, widely regarded as the best in the world, we could eliminate 40% of income taxes and still have the same deficit. if you look at the federal budget numbers, the budget is coming way down. the economy is improving. higher tacks allow us to create jobs where peo
is it really changing the way companies plan to do business next year? the ceo of stephen shipman joins us with an exclusive look at their latest cfo survey. how are cfos planning what washington can decide? liz: state across the country must decide today who will be setting of the mandatory health insurance exchange required by the health care act. the decision could have a big impact on your coverage and the prices you will pay and maybe insurance stocks. we will break down the numbers for you straight ahead. [ male announcer ] this is amy. amy likes to invest in the market. she also likes to ride her bike. she knows the potential for making or losing money can pop up anytime. th's why she trades with the leader in mobile trading. so she's always ready to take action, no matter how wily.. or weird... or wonderfully the market's behaving... which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. but with advair, i'm breathing better. so now i can be in the scene. advair is clinically proven to help significantly improve lung function. unlike most copd medications, advair c
out, i spoke with stephen moore from the "wall street journal". >> looking forward, not backward, the republican dangers, there may be an accelerating economy. you can't simply say obama is bad. you have to have an affirmative message. it has to be economically inclusive. that means i think ruling away from the myth of the heroic entrepreneur as the main hero and also the main victim of the american economy and understand that the people who have been leading big companies are actually doing pretty well. the harm is to the middle. >> stephen, talk to me about this. the fact is we do think the entrepreneur as heroic in the u.s. how do you square that circle? >> i think the backbone is the entrepreneur. i think republicans have to make this connection with workers that, you know, if you hurt the businesses who are hurting jobs, i don't think they've done a good job of doing that. i certainly agree that health care is a big issue. i kind of agree with david that republicans have kind attacked the obama idea. i think reasons have to a very robust alternative that might be rejected in
can republicans find an economic message that resonates with voters? to find out, i spoke with stephen moore from the "wall street journal." and a contributing editor at "newsweek" and author of a new book, how did he write this so fast "why romney lost. "looking forward, not backward. the republican dangers, there may be an accelerating economy. you can't simply say obama is bad. you have to have an affirmative message. it has to be economically inclusive. that means, i think, moving away from the myth of the heroic entrepreneur as the main hero and also the main victim of the american economy and understand that the people who have been leading big companies are actually doing pretty well. the harm has been done to the american middle which is experiencing slow growth. what we need to see above all are control of health care costs. that's the key to getting middle incomes rising again. >> stephen, talk to me about this. the fact is we do think the entrepreneur as heroic in the u.s. how do you square that circle? >> i think the backbone is the entrepreneur. it's the person who sets ou
. >> stephen carter we been talking to the national book festival. "the impeachment of abraham lincoln," if you want to know how it turns out, here's the book. you can buy to sell. stephen carter, thank you for joining us here in booktv for a few minutes. >> my pleasure, thank you so much. >> next, from the 12 annual national book festival, elizabeth dowling taylor presents her book, "a slave in the white house: paul jennings and the madisons." it's about 45 minutes. >> good afternoon. first i am a first time author, and i'm thrilled to be here. [applause] this was a true labor of love. i researched my topic for three years and spent a year-plus writing it. it is hummabling and gratifying to see it so well received, and to be following walter isakson, robert caro, and tony. [applause] i came to develop a strong interest in paul jennings when i was director of education at james madison's month peelier in virginia. i was familiar with jennings' memoir considered by the white house historical association to be the first memoir of life in the white house. it was titled "a colored man's rem innoce
for america's best loved company or is even more selling ahead? pete and john and jerry and stephen weiss and terranova are the traders. apple sits at the lows today as we come on the air. >> right. i have yet to find a reason for me to dip back into apple presently. you know, there's different stories out it seems like each and every day why it's out, what the buys are and selloffs all. forget all that for a moment. the stock seems to be stuck in a range and tlink are other opportunities out there. there's a lot of expectations for why it's moving around the way it is. specifically people are pointing to, is it for tax reasons? the other day it was for the margins. whatever the reason you're seeing an accelerated move each and every day. i haven't seen a reason to jump back in there yet. i still own the stock but not to add anything to it. i still think there are far better beta names out there to trade. >> doc, are you at odds with your brother? i want to read you stats that are going to shock you. >> please. >> in the past 9 of 11 weeks, $115 billion in market cap washed away from appl
points and stephen curry scored 22 to keep his record of seven straight games with 20 points or more going. the warriors are thirteen and seven on the season and are currently sitting in fifth place in the western conference. next up the warriors head to charlotte on monday to take on the bobcats. >> heavy snowfall has blanketed much of europe the snow has already caused a few headaches. flights have been canceled and delayed in cities such as paris and amsterdam. last weekend, heavy snow in russia shut down a major highway leaving drivers stranded. europe has more snow in the forecast. i was just in washington d.c. it was blue skies. and a sunny skies. >> it is still december. >> and time flies when you're having fun. >> it is going to be gorgeous with temperatures in the 60s. 63 degrees in san francisco, san jose. fremont. mid-60s, concord. and we do have some rainfall on the way but we will wait a little bit with light rain. with much cooler expected. >> perfect for the season. >> correct. >> that is it for us will see you at 11 (music)
business. stephen roell of johnson controls joins us. >> reporter: pfizer took a big hit this year when its blockbuster cholesterol drug lipitor came off patent. still ahead, the outlook for the generic drug business in 2013. >> susie: on wall street today, another triple-digit gain in blue chip stocks on hopes that a fiscal cliff deal is in the works. investors were also reassured by another positive report from the housing sector. homebuilder cfidence hit its highest level since the spring of 2006. but the housing recovery still has a ways to go: index readings above 50 reflect a positive outlook. some encouraging news on europe's economic crisis: standard and poor's gave greece a better grade. it got upgraded to a "b-minus" from "selective default" thanks to reassurances that greece will stay in the eurozone. on wall street, the dow rose 115 points, the nasdaq gained almost 44, and the s&p added 16. our next guest says any reasonable fiscal cliff deal is better than no eal. he's robert doll, chief equity strategist and senior portfolio manager at nuveen asset management. >> susie: hi, bo
.e.o. stephen roell told me he's worried that uncertainty about the fiscal cliff could hurt consumer confidence, and his business. >> we don't do that. as the consumer, i products to costumers like the big three, that in turn sell to the auto industry. my biggest concern is how it will affect the psychology of the consumer. i've been surprised, susie, that people continue to buy automobiles. but my fear is that could change dramatically. >> susie: steve, to what extent are the ups and downs impacting your business day to day. >> i think people are holding back on making captain investments. i see that particularly in the building side. from m stdpoit, i continue to invest around the world. i'll invest to make sure i'm buying the strategies we laid up for the next three years. the question is what it will do, depending on what the outcome is, how is it going to alter my strategies if the out come is different than i thought. >> susie: higher taxes is going to be a part of any deal. >> right. >> susie: are you open to higher taxes? how does it impact your business? >> i'm open to it. but i'm conc
, as we start to figure what is going on with republicangu party. it seems stephen hayes and a fet other folks are saying they did a great job in her standing up for them it i'm not saying anything, just asking questions this is a status quo position of the republican party? >> the rank and file out across history -- lou: who is it? >> look, i need a little bit ofk new blood. we do very, very well as we win the government raises and the midterm.e m lou: let me ask a democrat. >> have to find the talent bring them to do washington. lou: no names and don't mess it up too much. does that wor it work the same r the democrats? >> absolutely because republicans have won five of the last six elections. the never miss an opportunity to miss an opportunity and if they follow the prescription for what will happen is they will cosign themselves with their position. >> i just want to understand this, representing both sides that you both want, right? >> i'm saying the republican party lost, democrats have no mandate and republican don't change they will continue to lose. lou: notice you have to put
at the ground up. all the way up. [inaudible] let me talk about stephen's case, which he brought in the federal district court in new jersey. this was a man whose wife was a math teacher in high school. she had a healthy pregnancy. she remained in the classroom until the ninth month she went to the hospital to give birth, and the doctor came out and said, you have a healthy baby boy, but your wife died from an embolism. he was determined that he would not work full-time until the child was in school full-time. he would earn a minimum he could make, and combined with social security benefits, make a living for himself and his infant son. we went to the social security office. they said we are very sorry, but these are mothers benefits. they are not available. they are available to widowed mothers, but not widowed fathers. i came to know about stephen's case when he wrote a letter to the editor, and he said i've been hearing a lot of talk about women's this. this is what happened to me. how does that fit in? tell my story to gloria steinem. so at the time i was teaching at rutgers, the state univ
wanted to do. one of the historians who studied, i think it was -- stephen, said if jefferson hadn't decided to make it rather reckless investment of $30,000 in an outcome he probably would've been able to ride out the financial storms of the early 19th century. and another analysis of the financial records show that jefferson, a slaves actually were very productive farmers. and that in one of the first decades of the american agricultural economy, jefferson lost very little money on his farming operation. and so, the slaves were really holding their phones when commodity prices were plunging, and so, i mean and jefferson just kept spending -- the nail in the coffin for him financially was when he had alone with his in-laws. nicholas was speculating in kentucky land acquisitions, and he needed someone to cosign a $20,000 note and he talked jefferson into it and then six months later he went bankrupt. that's when the letters from monticello grill begin to get gloomy. -- really begin to get gloomy. >> i want to follow up -- >> we have a circulating microphone. >> all right. well, i w
of the literary award and stephen king. please join me in recognizing these great american writers. [applause] i would like to our financial supporters. without whom woe couldn't bring you awards the or programs. i would like you to hold your applause until i've read the list. premier sponsors barnes & noble, ban skies, random house, the ford foundation, leadership sponsors. harper colins, stephen king, debra buy lee, thank you. [applause] [applause] okay, now for something special. i'd like to acknowledge in the audience the winner of the fourth annual innovation in reading prize. funded by the lessening gear foundation. listen to the list and hold your applause until i'm finished. we have 15-year-old lily. she started givingly briers in a homeless shelter where kids can take as many books as they want they'd would own not borrow. in chicago reading against the odds. enhancing the critical thinking skills of adult literacy learnings by introducing them to challenging book. the at the library in colorado a group of teens calling themselves the interesting readers society. produce unique book tel
, dr. hansen is receiving the 2012 stephen schneider award for outstanding climate science communication bestowed by climate one. stephen schneider was a pioneering scientist at stanford who was involved in the formation of climate one that which is a sustainability initiative at the commonwealth club. so please welcome, dr. hansen to climate one. [applause] dr. hansen, welcome back. it's been two years since you were here. i'd like to begin with hurricane sandy. you are a teacher at columbia, you live in manhattan, where were you when sandy was approaching and when sandy hit new york? >> i was on our farm in kintnersville, pennsylvania, where we ended up losing power for better part of the week, and four big trees blown over, the railings blown off our deck and windows blown out of the barn. so even in pennsylvania, which is separated from the atlantic ocean by new jersey, we still -- >> thanks, new jersey. >> new jersey didn't do much to buffer it. but that's where i was. and we -- you know, the lights went out and we heard these noises on the second floor as the -- as th
dolphins owner, dolphins better than the beginning of the season. stephen ross joins us, he's smiling, next to discuss the plans. the futures are indicated higher. we've got that going for us, which is nice, "squawk box" will be right back. [ male announcer ] at scottrade, we believe the more you know, the better you trade. so we have ongoing webinars and interactive learning, plus, in-branch seminars at over 500 locations, where our dedicated support teams help you know more so your money can do more. [ rodger ] at scottrade, seven dollar trades are just the start. our teams have the information you want a where every cappuccino and latte is only made with fresh milk. and where the staff is exceptionally friendly. ♪ nespresso. what else? [ male announcer ] when this hotel added aflac to provide a better benefits package... oahhh! [ male announcer ] it made a big splash with the employees. [ duck yelling ] [ male announcer ] find out more at... [ duck ] aflac! [ male announcer ] ♪ ha ha! . >>> after a decade in the making, construction on hudson yards, new york city'
stephen correct that this actually economically makes sense, even if politically, it seems kind of like out of step with the times? >> i go worback and forth on th on the down side, it goes for slower wages. i think steven is right, it will lead to more jobs, i mean michigan is at a disadvantage against some of the right to work states that are just south of it and its lost a lot of the auto jobs to places like kentucky and tennessee and indiana. and this will probably make it more balanced. but again, it's going to weigh on wages. that's the bottom line here. >> the unions in michigan have given up quite a bit with the auto bailouts in 2009 and forward and so they have been -- it's a very much a cooperative relationship that's developed between the management and labor and the auto companies are in neutral on this legislation. >> really, remember during the bailout, the big sticking point was getting the unions to bend on their requirement, on their pensions, and i mean, at the time it was sort of not that long ago, almost unheard of, but the unions in michigan would bend on that. >> i
into the last shopping weekend before christmas, and stephen bebis is the ceo of brookstone and joins us now on how the holiday season has been shaping up. good morning to you. >> good morning. >> before we get into the holiday season, i need to admit something. i am the guy who sits in those chairs in the airport, you know how you have them in your -- in your store? >> yeah. >> and the massage chairs. and i wonder, do you sell those chairs? i know they're for sale. but how many of those chairs do you sell in a given year? >> we actually sell thousands of those chairs. it's one of our strongest items in our stores. our sales are up over 20% in shares this year alone. >> but you were mad when it just stopped and you were like, this is a mis -- i thought there was more. >> no. i get mad when the brookstone guy comes over and says you've been sitting in that chair for probably too long. and i haven't bought anything yet. >> well, we like you trying the chairs. we like to demonstrate those chairs. because once you sit in a brookstone chair, you're going to want one. they're fantastic. >> for not
with senator stephens on this, we got it done, so that facility stabbeds as a tribute to tan inouye. in 2010 i had a very difficult campaign, as most of us did at that time. and dan said, i'm going to come out there and help you. and i was under fierce attack, and we had an event for veterans, and dan was the speaker and i was the speaker, and as i was speaking we heard these voices of -- screaming demonstrators yelling things, which were not complimentary toward me. let's put it that way. but it was very loud, and i was so humiliate and embarrassed to hear what that's amazing patriot, and keep screaming when danny was speaking about my work and his work. sure enough, the demonstrators kept it up and i was so upset, and i went up to him and i put my arm around him and said, dan, i'm so embarrassed, i'm so sorry. he says, barbara, they're not going to beat you by screaming. don't worry about it. and he went on to go to a couple of events, and took his wife to them, and it was extraordinary. i love danny with all my heart. everytime i looked at him i smiled because he was so good. such a good pe
would you feel? >> just on the j.f.k. assassination thing. i just read one of stephen king's new books which is about the assassination and a man who has the ability to go back in time and tries to stop the assassination of j.f.k. does that mean we should put a thing on the front and say this didn't happen? at what point is it someone's responsibility to find out whether there is a backing up of that argument. it seems ridiculous when it's about time travel because there is no time travel yet. to a lot of people that would be absurd, where is that line? it's a gray area. >> i think the answer to somebody who will look at -- watch "24" and say see didn't i tell you americans are torture mongers. it goes to the old question of what is the effect, what's the cause and what's the effect of art and on public perception and behavior. would i personally feel responsible? i thought about it and i do think we all bear some responsibility but not complete responsibility. so somebody who doesn't have a critical capacity to turn on a television and realize this is fiction, this is not a representa
, stephen finan. this is live coverage on c-span2. >> [inaudible conversations] >> [inaudible conversations] >> [inaudible conversations] >> [inaudible conversations] >> [inaudible conversations] >> [inaudible conversations] >> [inaudible conversations] >> once again we are live on c-span2 at the immigrationworks u.s.a. at the woodrow wilson center for a forum hosted by immigrationworks u.s.a., look at the impact of the latino vote on the 2012 presidential race. we do expect it to get started in just a moment here. also starting live on the companion network c-span3, the pew center is hosting a daylong caucus on the voter experience of 2012. featuring representatives from google, facebook, microsoft and twitter. republican and democratic secretaries of state are also part of that discussion. that has just gotten underway life on our companion network c-span3. also coming up today the center for american progress is hosting a conference. this white house national economic council gene sperling and others are taking part on how education and innovation can benefit the u.s. economy. that's exp
th all the on the u.s. consulate in libya left ambassador chris stephens and three others dead. clinton will testify before the 130th congress sometime in january. she's also agreed to testify before the house foreign affairs committee. i'm li elizabeth pren in new yo. for all the headlines, log onto >>> a warning that some of our nation's biggest companies may be hoodwinking you, the taxpayers. major companies like gm taking advantage of all kinds of incentives and tax breaks from local and state governments, but are the communities, meaning you, the big losers. the new york times financial reporter first reported this. nice to see you. unbelievable story. these companies are getting huge breaks. >> i added it up across the country as comprehensive as i could. it's still missing some things but i identified over $80 billion a year for spending. there's cash grants, tax credits, free buildings, free roads, worker training. it's really a big tab. > >> greta: now, the reason why communities do that is the expectation that you give a company a break so the company tha
is with bell point alternatives and on the fundamental side of the story stephen weiss is with short hills capital. good to see you. jeff, make the case. you're looking at the charts. how do you like ups versus fedex? >> maria, i think you have to look at the longer-term chart, and if you look at the ten-year period, the true leader is federal express. it's up 76% versus the 24% that ups is. that's where you find the leaders. now let's take a closer look and look at the micro view of this chart, and we go to the year to date chart, and if you see a year to date, trading within a range, between 84 and 94, and what's going tonight difference. what's going tonight difference to push this to go higher, the catalyst, right. we wanted to see it go above $94 a share and the catalyst is going tonight international markets. we've seen some clarity over there, and you've seen a really -- fedex's international numbers have to increase, and that's the catalyst right there. >> jeff, they are both international. it depends on where you want to play. i like ups better because it's got a 3% yield versus a
came up to me and said good come you're still here, stephen wants to meet you. [laughter] and yes, and he does that he gets his purely reflect live off of my book. [laughter] [inaudible] [inaudible] >> yes, yes. the question is, we focus so much on lincoln, he's so fascinating and the war so dramatic and so terrible with shiloh in april, two days in which more people were killed and in all the battles of all the wars america had fought up to that point in two days. and later at sharpsburg, where more americans were killed and one day than any day before or since to this day. these horrible things rivet our attention and get the congress of 1862, the 37th congress was the most part it is inconsequential probably in our history. they created so many of our favorite institutions, like internal revenue service. more importantly, they missed those like the one the questioner referred to, the homestead act was passed in 1862. the transcontinental railroad act was passed. my favorite though, the moral act, which created the system of land grant colleges and universities in the united sta
's bring stephen moore in. i think you're going to disagree with my notion that government can be all that helpful to our runner. that government can be helpful other than by getting out of the way. i think you're going to suggest lower taxes, lower spending, fewer regulations. for the sake of this argument and analogy, accept that taxes are going up. there are many soifr who is argue that there is not a role for government in this let the markets and private industry handle it. but they haven't, and we've got substandard roads and bridges and electricity and broadband infrastructure. all of this means we're less attractive to business. do you accept that the government has a role to play in the rebuilding of america's infrastructure? >> well, sure. and by the way, i love your optimism, ali, i hope you're exactly right about 2013 and 2014. we've been spending money on the programs. a lot of the school buildings, i mean that's been going on in a large magnitude in the united states. what i like and where we might find some agreement, you know, i do think private-sector dollars can lead
. i am at a loss for words when you are done. stephen moore, i do hope you come back and see us soon. >> thank you, sir. stuart: here is an example of what i call tax hypocrisy. costco founder going to save because of the dividend payment this year. not next year, this year. the ceo, he is a very big obama supporter. even spoke at the democratic convention. >> a president who understands what the private sector needs to succeed. a president who takes the long view and makes the tough decisions. that is whh i am here tonight supporting president obama. stuart: supports president obama, supports tax the rich, but does not pay the rich taxes. i say tax hypocrisy and i am being very mild. >> i agree. every time i hear the rich guys say, you know, i want to pay more taxes. i say, you know what, if you want to do that, why don't you donate some money to the country. stuart: he borrows the money -- >> borrowings $3.5 billion. stuart: and then costco was downgraded. >> this kind of payout is done with earnings from a company. money is free right now. stuart: have they no shame, in my persona
to stephen weiss, who has been all over this. he mentioned, actually, he was talking about sears holdings taking away some of that, and that becomes an interesting story. because if sears can reinvent themselves and maybe they're being able to do it quicker than jcpenney, that could be a turnaround story that's well worth watching opposed to jcp -- >> you think sears is turning around in fashion -- >> i don't know if they're turning it around but they are starting to turn some around, and they are stealing customers for sure. >> macy's, of course, one of the biggest beneficiaries of j jcpenney going downhill -- >> they seem to have their act together. karen's liked macy's for awhile. if you had to pick between the two, i would rather own m right now than jcp, understanding there could be a huge short covering rally at some point, but if that's what you're betting against, i would just frankly ride on macy's. >>> coming up, shaking off if fiscal cliff fears and getting bullish for 2013. and find out what sectors he's betting on. >>> and then, our traders are telling you how to stack in you
is remarkable to me, stephen weiss, is that a lot of analysts are finally getting behind ron johnson and his style, because jcpenney has reverted back to its promotion always, which didn't work in the first place. >> it's mind boggling he still walks around with a halo. why you would ever want to go near this stock, even if they turn it around, it still selling at 20 times fiscal numbers. going to have to raise equity, versus now given what we've seen, the carnage. you have macy's at less than ten times next year and there's no turn around. so, why buy it? i still say sell it. ten bucks written all over it. go somewhere else. >> are you with weiss? >> i'm not in jcpenney at all right now. i'm long macy's. when you look at jcpenney, i want to short the name. so, you saw when it started to rally back about four months ago, it went from 26 to 31 on a rumor. that's short covering there. so, this is a tough name to be short. because there's so much short -- >> i'm no longer short. i covered in the high teens. >> the one thing we didn't mention on yesterday's show was the long, the pending potenti
and stephen rogness. they were taken to john muir medical center in walnut creek. two of the firefighters needed to have surgery. all three are expected to survive. >> a 14 year-old boy charged as an adult with attempted murder, sexual assault and kidnapping of a 65 year-old woman is scheduled to be arraigned today. he will appear in court where he is expected to be arraigned today. >> san jose has marked its 43rd homicide of the year. matching a two decade high. the most recent hamas i was a 17 year-old boy who was gunned down on a residential street on friday. if the killings is believed to be gang-related. the 43 homicides so far this year atop the 41 killings last year. the 2011 total was double the previous year's number of homicides. >> oakland police officials have made 44 percent fewer rest last year than just three years before. the plunge includes the rest from armed robbery case is a drug bust. to my kron site public drunkenness. that's an average of 18th your rest per day. this year the city is facing a 23% spike in murders, muggings and other major offenses. the arrests figur
, he's got me. host: stephen, who did you vote for in 2008? in 2012.ean caller: i voted for president obama. i really liked mitt romney. why do i have to pay less taxes than my friend from massachusetts? that really bugged me. host: that is stephen from connecticut. tyrone is a republican from the bronx. caller: i think hillary clinton would be an excellent candidate in 2016. i think she handled the middle eastern issue to the best of her ability. also, as far as the gop is concerned, i think she has made strides toward eliminating the tax spending through various commitments with private entities and organizations that are coming out of the woodwork. i was watching earlier today and what they were requesting from the white house was let's fix this problem by incorporating a small businesses and less government intervention to curb the deficit. it has been astronomical. then i heard barack obama say the way we are going to do it is by making more cuts in various ways. he was saying by making more cuts and the only people it is going to hurt is the working class and somewhat of the mid
a little stephen, a little optimism -- steepening, a little optimism that growth will be better, but i suspect it's not because of quantitative easing it's going to do that. it's more that people will be focused on what the fed's going do next, which we think is a big communications policy change which we think will come at the march meeting. >> what will the communication change be? >> yeah, the communication change we're expecting is that the federal reserve will go to what we're now calling an evans rule which is the fed will basically say we're going to hold rates low and remain accommodative until such time as unemployment's much lower or inflation is much higher. neither of those things seems likely. we think that this will just extend out the market's expectation of when the fed is going to start taking back some of the accommodation they've added the last five years. even into 2017 is what we're expecting the market to start pricing. >> how are treasuries going to trade through -- if this scenario pans out, how are treasuries going to trade through it? >> i think firstly the fi
interesting to see those political documents falling after his name. host: stephen, thank you so much. we have been talking this morning about the shooting on friday in connecticut. president obama will be headed to new town this evening. he will be attending a memorial service and he will speak at an interfaith vigil for the families and the victims. he will be meeting with the families and he will be thanking the first responders. all of that this evening on c- span. we will be right here. something else that we are doing right now this holiday season is looking at the chaplains who work in the building behind us in the u.s. capitol. you can find more information about this on our facebook page. you will be able to see who these people are, their biographies, and you will be able to learn more information about them. coming up next, we will be learning more about the so- called fiscal cliff. later on, the president of dreamworks will talk to us about the future of the tree -- the tea party. >> coming up later, we will vieira network tv talk shows on c-span radio. the focus on all of those sh
programs about economics. arlie hochschild. then tomorrow stephen han and sara gordon sit down with booktv to talk about their books. also on sunday at 2 p.m. eastern danny danon discussing his book, "israel: the will to prevail," followed by patrick tyler, author of "fortress israel: the inside story of the military elite who run the country and why they can't make peace." watch this and more all weekend long on booktv. for a complete schedule can, visit >> strangle me -- [inaudible] >> give it to him hard! >> he's not safe on that bus. >> i've been on that bus. they are just as good as gold. >> as all of us, i think, in this country we're starting to see people coming out and talking about their experience of this phenomenon that so many of us had experienced in one way or another and had had no words for other than adolescence, other than growing up. finally people were starting to stand back and say, hold on, this isn't actually a normal part of growing up, this isn't a normal rite of passage. i think there was of a moment where there is a possibility for change, and dire
with stephen that the original is a little outdated in terms of facing all the myriad threats and predation that developed in the war on terror and passed very shortly after 9/11 and we know a lot more from our experience so congress appropriately decided it was time for them to take a look at whether or not we needed to be more explicit and in some areas expand on the a u.s. map. to be in favor of something that did require congress to revisit that every couple years it would be useful to make sure our political leadership rather than leave that hanging out there is something for the next ten years as things develop, as threats either expand or recede, our political leaders in congress should appropriately way in, from justice jackson's famous concurrence with congress and the executive acting together that that is the height of authority in these military matters. the executive is constantly involved in these things. we know where the executive stand but congress can act and sit back and the executive from the law so useful clarifying function for the courts if congress does periodically
of them from saint stephens kindergarten class. thank you, miss murphy. thank you, janice dean. fabulous. on "money" we discuss the some ceos formally spoke out against president obama's policies after the election doing about face and backing him. tastid-light founder, and white castle and fast signs ceo join me on 5:00 eastern on fox business. lori: thompson, thanks. is the stock market pricing in a tumble over the fiscal cliff? losh abet senior economist and market strategist milton miss rought at this breaks it down with tracy and ash. stick around >> gold bars i suppose. >> i would be buying gold bars and real estate. >> under the mattress. >> let it all go. ashley: nothing wrong with those. not at all. >> and on that note --, take it away. ashley: thank you, ladies. as lori just said, drifting along. market up by 11 points. good afternoon, i'm ashley webster. tracy: i'm tracy byrnes. political theater over the fiscal cliff. how a senate battle over the presidential power around the debt ceiling could shape the cliff talks going forward. ashley: apple shares up today, but still down
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